SAT results are in and students are definitely talking.

"The big test"

Makyia Whitaker, Staff Reporter

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The S.A.T. (Scholastic Assessment Test)  scores are in, and students are definitely talking. The S.A.T. is a big part of a students’ lives for furthering their education after high school, so these scores are important for their future. Some students were excited when viewing their results, others not so much, and the rest are just too nervous to check.

Many juniors have seen this year’s seniors go through this experience last year, but it is much different when in your shoes.

“My SAT score is better than average but not what I had hoped for. I want to go to Spelman College, so I’ll have to retake my S.A.T. in order to achieve that goal,” Alexis Jordan said.

“Honestly, I feel like a score shouldn’t be able to determine if a student should be able to go to a good college or not. I still took the test and received a decent score so that did not discourage me, it just helped me,” Fantasia Moorer said.

“I feel like the S.A.T. is a waste of time, a test shouldn’t determine how smart you are, or how good you are because a student could have all A’s their entire high school experience and still score below a 900. Getting that low of a score could discourage students, and make them feel like they’re not good enough,” Shimere Searcy said.

“I hate the S.A.T. because it makes me nervous even thinking about it and I’m afraid of not succeeding to my highest potential,” Collin George said.

“The S.A.T. wasn’t hard for me, it just put a lot much pressure on me, and it was so many questions which really blinded my main focus.” Lexie Syacsure said.

“The S.A.T. is stressful and it puts a lot of pressure on a student, so I had to stay focused and make sure I was ready for it. I haven’t checked my results but I’m sure whatever I got is a reflection of all of my hard work paying off,” Alexander Grey said.

“I had just transferred to Roseville 3 weeks prior to taking the S.A.T., it was kind of hard for me because at my previous school I had no E.L.A. (English Language Arts) teacher which meant no preparation for the S.A.T. my entire junior year of high school

. When getting my scores back and seeing that I got 1000, I figured it was decent for the circumstances. I’m thinking about a retake but it’s not the first thing on my mind, overall I did as I thought I would,” Daylan Clark said.

 

“You should take the S.A.T. very serious because it is important and colleges really do look at that. I took the S.A.T. as a joke my first time around, and I had to retake it. It wasn’t fun and I wish I would have listened to the upperclassmen who told me that it wasn’t a joke. What I can say is it all worked out for the better in the end,” senior Briana Moreland Davis said.

“If students do not like their scores, they are more than welcome to retake them as much as they’d like to pay for. Students with free reduced lunch can retake the sat for free, so it is important to know what your options are,” counselor Jen Goetzinger said.  

Counselor Kelly O’Callaghan echoed this, encouraging students to retake if they feel it is necessary but also making sure they know there is importance to the SAT.

“We want kids to exceed to their highest potential and not get discouraged if their scores came back lower than expected. There are many opportunities out there to help you improve your scores and your G.P.A. to better your chances,” counselor Kelly O’Callaghan said.